Monday 01.26.15

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New Parking Rules. We have some new neighbors moving next-door so please be respectful for their two parking spaces on the main side of the gym. Please do not park in any other stop than the ones labeled HGX. Also do not park along either side of the building (as seen in picture). The new business needs to have space to back cars in and out of their building. There is plenty of unmark spots in the back of the complex. Thank you

Skills/Strength
Back Squat
75%x3
80%x2
85%x2x2
WOD
21-15-12-9-6
OHS (95/65)
Bar over Burpees

Saturday 01.24.15

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Every first Saturday of the month we host a Fitness4Free beginners class after the regular class at 10:00-11:00am. If you know of anyone that might be interested or is interested please spread the word. If you refer someone and they sign up for full membership you will receive 25% off your next month. So tell your friends.

WOD
Teams of 3- Tag Team Style *one person completes a station then tags a team mate who completes the next station
25 Min AMRAP
5 Deadlifts # 225/185 or 155/115 or 135/95
10 Box Jumps 20/24
10 KB Snatch #55/35-#35/26
3 wall climbs
10 burpees
10 wall ball #20/14
100m Sprint

Friday 01.23.15

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Be Aware Of The ‘Little’ Injuries
Don’t ignore or overlook those little nagging injuries—the sprains, rips, or muscle flares—if you do, they could lead to far bigger ones. Much as you should avoid over training to prevent serious injury, you need to be aware of the value in taking one or two days off to let those small injuries subside. If you don’t swallow your ego and refuse to take a few days off, that small injury might develop into a serious one that puts you on the sideline for a month or more.

Skills/Strength
Snatch Balance
70%x3x2
75%x3x3
WOD
5 Rounds
:50 sec max effort :10 sec Rest/Trans.
Ring Rows
Push ups
Air Squats

Thursday 01.22.15

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Avoiding Over Training, Listen to Your Body
Your body undergoes tremendous strain during a workouts, and it needs all the elements of proper recovery (nutrients, mobilization and rest) to properly repair itself; If that means taking a day or two away from training entirely, than so be it. People often make the mistake of assuming that they need to train every day of the week in order to be successful in this sport and achieve their fitness goals. False. Rest and active recovery gives your muscle fibers (and connective tissues) time to heal and repair themselves, resulting in an overall stronger muscle. This is the process in which you get stronger, so continually putting stress on them by working out everyday will actually do more harm than good. It will result in weaker muscles that are more prone to excessive damage and injury.
As such, it’s crucial that you listen to what your body is telling you. Now, there is a difference between the types of pain you may experience in a workout. Lactic acid build-up, gasping for air and muscle fatigue are common symptoms associated with a workout, but it may be the case that these symptoms are generated by your brain and have nothing to do with the state of your body at that time. Your brain assumes that you’re pushing yourself too hard and regulates your performance accordingly, when in reality you could continue to push at such a level for an extended period of time. On the other hand, when you feel sharp, distinctive muscular/joint pain, dizziness or an inability to breathe, these are clear signs that something is wrong and you need to stop immediately. It makes no sense to push through pain that is becoming increasingly more severe in order to hit a PR.You’re not at the Games, you’re not getting paid to workout, and you will hurt yourself. LISTEN TO YOUR BODY!

Skills/Strength
Power Snatch
70%x2
75%x2
80%x1
85%x1x3
WOD
In Teams of 2 complete
5000m Row
EMOM Burpee Ladder 1-2-3-4-5…etc.
Partner A-Max Meters on Rower
Partner B-Performs 1 Burpee and rests Min 1:00 rotate and
Partner A-Performs 2 Burpees and rest Partner B-Max Meters on Rower
Continue until 5000m

Wednesday 01.21.15

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Utilize proper technique, weight and scale when necessary
These three culprits are the main reason(s) for injury in sport—not just CrossFit. We (sadly) see it all too often in the box. An athlete that has forgotten to check their ego at the door will throw on an RX weight to their bar and proceed to perform the most horrifying snatches you will ever see. No wonder they tear their rotator cuff and CrossFit gets a bad rap. Part of being a CrossFitter is understanding what weight you can move, when you can move it, and how effectively you can move it. These are important factors to consider because if ignored, it will almost certainly result in an injury.
Thankfully, there is a quick fix, and it starts with you. Have an honest conversation with yourself when you see the WOD on the whiteboard—even talk to your coach about it—as to whether you can perform each movement that is listed with the weight required both safely and efficiently. This doesn’t mean going RX if you’ve been able to hit that clean weight once or twice before. You need to be confident that you can perform multiple repetitions at that weight. If you can’t, and you know that you can’t, either lower the weight accordingly, or scale the movement entirely if you lack the flexibility and/or technique to perform it in the first place. There is no shame in doing this! You are simply moving through the progressions in a smart manner, and you’ll probably have far better technique when it comes to performing a movement as prescribed.
A final point of emphasis is to work on your skills during open gym or when you have some free time. Practice helps you learn how to move weight (and your own body) in a more efficient manner—benefiting your overall performance and reducing the risk of injury.

Skills/Strength
Clean Pull
100% (of cln) x 3
105%x3
110%x3x2
WOD
21-15-9
Sit ups
OHS (L2 135/95, L1)
*L2 GHD Sit ups